Suffolk County Domestic Violence and Menacing

N.Y. Pen. Law §§ 120.13, 120.14 & 120.15

Menacing is a crime that involves doing something that puts another person in fear of immediate physical injury. No such physical injury is required to be charged with menacing. Menacing is sometimes a charge placed against a defendant as a result of an incident of domestic violence. Law enforcement often responds to calls related to domestic disturbances. A domestic violence crime is one that involves 2 people who have some sort of domestic relationship. While menacing is one of the less serious criminal offenses commonly involved in domestic incidents, if you are convicted you could still end up spending time behind bars. Thus, if you have been charged with menacing stemming from a domestic disturbance it is important that you immediately contact an experienced Suffolk County Domestic Violence and Menacing Lawyer who will explain to you your legal rights and who will work closely with you to defend you against the charges.

Types of menacing charges

There are 3 menacing offenses in New York, 2 of which are misdemeanors, while 1 is a felony. Each involves the perpetrator in some way making the victim fearful for his or her safety.

Menacing in the third degree. You will face this charge if you intentionally place another person in fear of death or immediate serious physical injury or physical injury. It is a Class B misdemeanor. N.Y. Pen. Law § 120.15. While an incident that results in physical injury can result in a charge of menacing, physical injury is not required. For example in People v. Betko, 907 N.Y.S.2d 102 (2010), defendant Czeslaw Betko was convicted of menacing in the third degree after holding a knife and saying threatening words to his wife. In this case the defendant did not cause the victim physical harm. On the other hand, in People v. Smith, 963 N.Y.S.2d 813 (2013), in domestic incident defendant Terrence Smith punched his wife in the head. Not only was Smith charged with menacing in the third degree, he was also convicted of attempted assault in the third degree and harassment in the second degree.

Menacing in the second degree. Menacing in the second degree is similar to menacing in the third degree, except that it also involves:

  • Branding a deadly weapon, dangerous instrument or what appears to be a pistol, revolver, rifle, shotgun, machine gun or other firearm
  • Repeatedly following another person or engages in a course of conduct that pouts another person in reasonable fear of physical injury or death.
  • Committing menacing in the third degree and in doing so violate an Order of Protection

Menacing in the second degree is a Class A misdemeanor. N.Y. Pen. Law § 120.14

Menacing in the first degree. Menacing in the first degree is the most serious menacing offense. Menacing in the first degree is the same as menacing in the second degree except that you have previously been convicted of menacing in the second degree in the prior 10 years. It is a Class E felony. N.Y. Pen. Law § 120.13

Consequences of a menacing conviction

Because menacing is classified as either a misdemeanor or a low level felony, if you are convicted there is a good possibility that you will not have to spend much if any time in jail or prison. Instead, you may be sentenced to just a probation.

Prison and Fines

  • Class B misdemeanor. The maximum possible sentence is 90 days in jail and a fine of up to $500.
  • Class A misdemeanor. The maximum possible sentence is 1 year in jail and a fine of up to $1,000.
  • Class E felony. The maximum possible sentence is 4 years in prison and a fine of up to $5,000.
Probation

Part or all of your sentence may also include probation. For misdemeanor menacing the probation term will be 3 years, while for felony menacing the probation term will be 5 years. While probation is preferable to incarceration, probation has many restrictions. Violating any of the terms attached to your probation can result in additional criminal charges, revocation of your probation, and being sent to prison.

Financial Consequences

As part of your sentence the judge may order you to pay fines, fees, and restitution. For felony menacing the fine would be up to $5,000, while for a misdemeanor offense the fine would be up to $1,000. Fees include a "mandatory surcharge" of $300 for a felony and $175 for a misdemeanor, as well as a victim assistance fee of $25. N.Y. Pen. Law § 60.35. If your sentence includes probation you will be required to pay a monthly probation supervision fee of $30. The amount of restitution you may be ordered to pay will be based on the losses suffered by the victim such as medical bills. Generally, the maximum amount of restitution is $15,000 for a felony and $10,000 for a misdemeanor, plus a 5% surcharge. If a judge orders you to pay a fine or restitution, payment is part of your sentence. If you fail to pay you may be charged with yet another crime that could mean up to a year in prison.

Orders of Protection

Domestic violence menacing cases almost always involve the criminal court judge issuing an Order of Protection in favor of the victim. The court will likely issue a temporary Order of Protection that may be a "stay away" Order of Protection, "refrain from" Order of Protection or a combination of both. If an Order of Protection is a stay away order, then you must not have any type of contact with that person.

If there is a refrain from Order of Protection, then you are prohibited from harassing, intimidating, threatening or otherwise interfering with that person. While a criminal court Order of Protection that is issued at the beginning of a criminal case is generally temporary, depending on the outcome of the case, a temporary Order of Protection may become final or permanent-- meaning that it will remain in effect for several years. It the court concludes that there is no basis for the Order of Protection, it will be dismissed. If you believe that there is no basis for the order, you can fight it.

However, if an Order of Protection is in place and you violate it, you risk being charged with criminal contempt, a misdemeanor. As punishment you could be sentenced to jail or probation.

Additional criminal charges

Beware that if you are arrested for menacing it is very likely that you will face other criminal charges such as harassment, assault, or stalking. Any additional charges could result in convictions for additional crimes. This would greatly impact the severity of your sentence.

Being arrested for domestic violence based on menacing is very serious. Not only are you likely to send up in prison for a number of years, after you serve your prison term you will have a criminal record. As a result, many aspects of your life will be much more difficult. The staff at Stephen Bilkis & Associates, PLLC has years of experience successfully defending clients in New York criminal courts who have been charged with domestic violence, menacing, as well as other criminal offenses such as assault, reckless endangerment, strangulation, stalking, and child endangerment. Contact us at 1.800.NY.NY.LAW (1.800.696.9529) to schedule a free, no obligation consultation regarding your case. We serve those accused of domestic violence in the following locations:

CONTACT US FOR A FREE CONSULTATION
1-800-NY-NY-LAW (1-800-696-9529)